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Artist's Innovation Award 2015 Winners

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Heather Cahoon

Heather Cahoon

 

Cahoon’s writing combines traditional lyric poetry, full of images from the Western landscape, with complicated cultural issues. In describing her own work, she says “…it is my aim that my poetry will positively affect my community and other people attempting the daunting and often unmapped task of processing the things that have pained them most.”

Heather Cahoon grew up in St. Ignatius, Montana on the Flathead Indian Reservation where she is an enrolled Pend d’ Oreille. She has an MFA in Poetry from The University of Montana and was the recipient of the 2000 Richard Hugo Memorial Scholarship and the 2005 Merriam Frontier Award for publication of her book, Elk Thirst. She also holds an interdisciplinary PhD in history, anthropology, and Native American Studies. Her writing has appeared in numerous national and international publications. She lives in Missoula, Montana with her husband and sons and teaches Native Studies and poetry at The University of Montana.

Poetry sample

 

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Jack Gladstone

Jack Gladstone

 

Jack Gladstone is an enrolled citizen of the Blackfeet Nation. He illustrates American Indian culture through a mosaic of music, lyric poetry and spoken word narrative. A 2015 winner of the Governor’s Humanities Award, Gladstone calls himself a “story smith, forging ancient, historical and contemporary narratives into accessible lyrical art.”

An enrolled citizen of the Blackfeet Nation and a former college instructor, Gladstone co-founded Glacier National Park’s renowned lecture series, “Native America Speaks” in 1985. Jack has released fifteen critically acclaimed CDs. His latest release, “Native Anthropology,” garnered the prestigious “Best Historical Recording” from the Native American Music Association. In the spring of 2013, Gladstone became the first Montanan to receive the C.M. Russell Heritage Award, given to honor his contribution to the “legacy, culture and life of the American West.” In 2014, he debuted an elementary and middle school writing program utilizing Russell's artwork as primary documents. Students discover clues within Russell’s compositions that promote an appreciation of his perspective towards the featured work and then write narratives, song lyrics, or poetry using the topics at hand.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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Louis Habeck

 

Louis Habeck headshot
Louis Habeck artwork
Louis Habeck artwork
 

 

Louis Habeck is an interdisciplinary artist, with sculpture as his primary focus. He uses non-traditional materials, but whether through painting or sculpture, Louis prefers to depict peculiar, melancholy creatures which somehow manage to retain a slight sense of whimsy. Panelists praised his innovative and creative use of materials, and the compelling execution of his vision. Of his recent work, Habeck says, “I have been painting still lifes, portraits and landscapes on creatures that I have sculpted instead of using traditional flat canvases... My current body of work involves the sculpting and casting of life-size triceratops heads.” Habeck was born and currently resides in Billings, MT. He graduated from The University of Montana in 2011, receiving a Bachelor of Fine Art with an emphasis in photography, however, his work spans the boundaries between most mediums. He has given multiple sculpture lectures and demos for classes at Northwest College, Montana State University Billings, and the MAEA Conference (Montana Art Education Association), and spent the spring as the artist-in-residence at the Yellowstone Art Museum’s Visible Vault. 


 


 

Maggy Rozycki Hiltner

 

Maggy Rozycki Hiltner
Hurricane detail by Maggy Rozycki Hiltner
Providence detail by Maggy Rozycki Hiltner

 

Rozycki Hiltner is known for her use of vintage imagery and traditional techniques to create complex, contemporary art. Her work has been featured in group and solo exhibitions all over the United States and internationally, from Los Angeles to New York City, and from Montana to Kansas to Michigan. In the fall of 2015, she was the Artist-In-Residence at the Yellowstone Art Museum while her 288-square-foot hand-stitched piece, Vantage Point, was on exhibit. Currently, her large-scale collaged embroidery can be seen in the touring exhibit, Extreme Fibers: Textile Icons and the New Edge, at Michigan’s Dennos Museum Center. In 2016, she had solo exhibitions at the Lawrence Arts Center, KS, Bellevue Arts Museum, WA, and in May 2017 at the Missoula Art Museum. Her work is carried in Montana at Toucan Gallery in Billings, tart in Bozeman, and Turman Larison in Helena.

Maggy Rozycki Hiltner earned a BFA in sculpture from Syracuse University before turning to fiber arts as a specialty. She lives in Red Lodge with her two daughters and her husband, David Hiltner.


 


 

Kate Hunt

 

Kate Hunt
Burnt Flag
Neltje's Sister Torrington

 

Hunt’s work is object oriented. Her materials include steel, twine, boat building epoxy, encaustic, and newspaper. Hunt first started working with newspaper at the Kansas City Art Institute. Her teacher, Joan Livingstone, had her make a "Chinese finger trap", the kind found at carnivals that tighten as you try to pull your fingers out. From there she started building large weavings with newspaper. In describing her choice of material, Hunt says, “I realized early on that newspaper lent itself to me because it is easy to get, durable (there is a reason our landfills are filled with the stuff) and very forgiving. While I use it as a construction material, everyone has a history with newspaper that brings another layer to the work that I love.”

Kate Hunt was raised in a town of 900 on the plains of Montana, and the subtle power of the landscape has influenced her work. Hunt graduated from the Kansas City Art Institute and Cranbrook Academy of Art. She has shown nationally and internationally and her work is in many prominent collections.


 


 

Steven Young Lee

Winner of the Jessie Wilber and Frances Senska Individual Artist Award, established by a private gift to the arts council from Stacy Hamm and Sage Walden.

 

Steven Lee
Jar with Dragon
Vase with Lotus Pattern


Lee describes his work as “a collage of forms and motifs from various origins--Chinese, Korean, French, Dutch, English, Minoan, etc. The pieces I create, appropriate elements of form, decoration, color, image and material from various cultures and historical periods.” Lee creates exquisitely shaped and painted pots, then uses the clay’s own tendency to crack or misshape to blow apart the traditional forms, resulting in beautiful, innovative new works.

Steven Young Lee received his MFA in Ceramics from the New York State College of Ceramics at Alfred University in 2004. In 2004-2005, he lectured and taught at numerous universities throughout China. While there, Lee created a new body of work as part of a one-year cultural and educational exchange fellowship in Jingdezhen, Jianxi Province. He has taught at Interlochen Center for the Arts in Michigan, the Clay Art Center in New York, the Lill Street Studio in Chicago and Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design in Vancouver, B.C. Lee is currently the Resident Artist Director of the Archie Bray Foundation.

 



 

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Deirdre McNamer

Deirdre McNamer

 

Deirdre McNamer graduated from The University of Montana School of Journalism in 1973 and began her professional writing career as a journalist, working for the Associated Press in Portland, Oregon. In 1980 she moved back to Missoula and took a job at the Missoulian, where she began to move away from straight news reporting to long feature stories and profiles, which won regional newspaper prizes. In 1982, she was awarded a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for Professional Journalists at the University of Michigan.

In 1985 she entered the University of Montana’s creative-writing program, earning an MFA in 1987. Her first novel, Rima in the Weeds, was published in 1991 and won that year’s Pacific Northwest Booksellers Award for fiction. Two more novels, One Sweet Quarrel (1994) and My Russian (1999) were New York Times Notable Books of the year, and Red Rover (2007) won the Montana Book Award from the state library association and made Best Books of 2007 lists in Artforum, the Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post.

McNamer has continued to write short essays for the New Yorker and many other venues. She has taught creative writing at the college level since 1992, served as chair of the fiction panel for the 2011 National Book awards and judged the 2015 PEN/Faulkner awards.

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Jeremy Sher

 

Jeremy Sher
Jeremy Sher standing
Jeremy Sher crouching

 

Jeremy Sher is a professional actor living in Missoula. He has co-founded several performance ensembles over the past 20 years in France, Spain, Seattle, St. Louis and Chicago. He has performed and trained in disciplines from classical theatre to Japanese dance, often with multi-national casts. He has trained in Suzuki and Viewpoints with Anne Bogart and SITI Company in New York & Chicago, and has led Suzuki training groups in Seattle, St. Louis, Paris and Chicago. He has also taught Improvisation and Movement workshops at several universities across the country. His passion lies in “devising” – a process of creating original work on one’s feet in the studio. Since moving to Missoula in 2012, Sher has worked with the Montana Rep (Circle Mirror Transformation, Missoula Colony), done several staged readings in town and in Idaho with award-winning playwright Robert Caisley (Happy, Lucky Me, Art), and he created a hit show combining his pastry chef experience with original comedic interpretation in 2014, slated to tour the Pacific Northwest in 2016. Described with such terms as “elegance, “taste,” and “humor,” Sher’s creative and innovative professionalism was praised by panel reviewers.


 

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